• About this program

    The Bachelor of Arts in Business has a strong interdisciplinary focus. The curriculum adheres to a philosophy that effective decision-making requires a broad understanding of the institutional and cultural climate within which businesses are operating. The program uses the resources of Manchester’s business community and its economic strengths to provide students with skills, knowledge and opportunities.

    The Business program offers areas of focus in Accounting, Business Economics and Political Economy, Business and Technology, Management, Marketing, and Human Resource Management. Students with a unique interest can create a self-designed concentration with approval of his/her advisor and the Coordinator of the Business program. Select the "Areas of Study" tabs for more information.

    A culminating capstone experience enables students to apply their knowledge in the form of an internship, applied senior project, or special topics seminar. Because this is a Bachelor of Arts program, students fulfill the foreign language requirement. Students have the opportunity to enhance fluency through community experiences and internships. Graduates of UNH Manchester’s business program are in demand because they offer future employers a portfolio of practical and theoretical knowledge and experience combined with effective communication and leadership skills.

    For more information contact Kelly Kilcrease, Program Coordinator, at 603-641-4186 or kelly.kilcrease@unh.edu; or contact the Office of Admissions.

  • Program of Study

    Students must complete 128 credits to graduate. Each required course must be completed with a minimum grade of C-. Students must attain a minimum GPA of 2.0 in major courses required for graduation. Majors cannot use BUS 430, ECN 411, or ECN 412 to satisfy both Discovery Program and major requirements. Transfer students must complete at least half of their credits in the major and the eight-credit capstone experience in residence at UNH Manchester.

    Introductory Business Core Courses (8 courses)
    BUS 400, Introduction to Business
    ECN 411, Introduction to Macroeconomic Principles
    ECN 412, Introduction to Microeconomic Principles
    CIS 411, Introduction to Computer Applications
    CIS 510, Computer Information Systems
    BUS 430, Business Statistics
    BUS 532, Financial Accounting
    BUS 533, Managerial Accounting

    Intermediate Business Core (3 courses)
    BUS 610, Marketing Principles and Applications
    BUS 620, Organizational Behavior
    BUS 601: Financial Management

  • Capstone

    Business Capstone Experience (2 courses BUS 701 and one senior business seminar (in the BUS 750, 760, or 770) fulfills the Discovery Program Capstone requirement for business majors and are taken during the senior year)

    BUS 701, Business, Government and Society and
    BUS 750, Business Internship Seminar or
    BUS 760, Applied Senior Project or
    BUS 770, Special Topics Senior Seminar

    Note: Because this is a Bachelor of Arts program, students must fulfill a language requirement. Efforts will be made to enhance fluency through subsequent courses and community experiences.

  • Areas of Study

    Accounting
    Junior Year
    BUS 603, Intermediate Financial Accounting I
    BUS 615, Intermediate Financial Accounting II
    BUS 629, Advanced Managerial Accounting (spring semester)
    Senior Year
    BUS 710, Federal Taxation (fall semester)
    BUS 720, Auditing (fall semester)

    Business Economics and Political Economy
    4 courses from the following (including at least one course at 600-level or above)
    POLT 401, Politics and Society
    POLT 403, United States in World Affairs
    POLT 560, World Politics
    ECN 640, Business Law and Economics
    ECN 625, Regulation of Business
    ECN 635, Money, Banking and Macroeconomic Activity
    ECN 650, Economics for Managers
    ECN 670, Public Sector Economics
    HUMA 412, Industry and Welfare
    HUMA 660, The Moral Dimensions of Economic Life
    POLT 595, 596 Explorations in Politics
    POLT 762, International Political Economy
    BUS 695, Independent Study

    Business and Technology
    4 courses from the following
    CIS 405, Introduction to the Internet and Web Authoring
    CIS 425, Introduction to Computer Programming
    CIS 515, Multimedia: Introduction and Applications
    CIS 520, Database Design and Development
    CIS 550, Networking Concepts
    CIS 610, System Analysis and Design

    Management
    4 courses from the following
    BUS 453, Leadership for Managers
    BUS 550, Business Law
    BUS 630, International Management
    BUS 650, Operations Management
    ECN 650, Economics for Managers

    Marketing
    4 courses from the following

    A. At least two must be from marketing
    BUS 565 Selling & Sales Management
    BUS 661 Integrated Marketing Communications
    BUS 663 Services Marketing & Operations Management
    BUS 665 International Marketing Strategy Management

    B. May also include two courses from:
    BUS 675 Special Topics: Negotiations
    BUS 695 Independent Study (Marketing/Communication Project)
    UMST 500 Internship (in Marketing or Communication)
    CIS 405 Internet & Web Authoring

    Human Resource Management

    4 courses from the following
    BUS 455: Management of Human Resources
    BUS 520: Training and Development
    BUS 640: Business Communication and Conflict
    BUS 660: Employment and Labor Law

    Self Designed
    4 courses (or 16 credit hours) with faculty approval, including at least one course at 500-level or above.

  • Minor

    Business Minor
    The minor in business allows students to pursue their interests in the liberal arts and sciences while building a foundation of business skills and adding a valuable credential to their portfolio and resume. The minor in Business requires successful completion of five Business courses or 20 credit hours from the courses listed below.

    The three required courses
    BUS 400, Introduction to Business
    BUS 532, Introduction to Financial Accounting
    ECN 412 or 411, Intro to Microeconomics or
    Macroeconomics

    Two courses from the following list are required (at least one of which must be at the 600-level or above)
    BUS 430, Business Statistics
    BUS 533, Managerial Accounting
    BUS 601, Financial Management
    BUS 610, Marketing Principles
    BUS 620, Organizational Behavior
    BUS 650, Operations Management

    Other 600- or 700-level courses in Business (BUS) or Economics (ECN) may be substituted for courses listed above with permission of the Business Program Coordinator. This may include an Internship course (UMST 500), Special Topics courses (BUS 675/685), or an Independent Study in Business (BUS 695).

    Students must complete the five courses with a cumulative minimum grade point average of 2.0 in the five courses (20 credits), with no course below a C- grade. Transfer course approval for the minor would be limited to at most two relevant courses successfully completed at another accredited institution, subject to syllabi review and approval. Students must complete a minimum of 20 credits for the minor, with a maximum of eight credits transferred from accredited institutions and a minimum of 12 credits completed in residence at UNH.

    For more information contact Bill Troy, Minor Supervisor, at 603-641-4345 or wtroy@unh.edu.

    Entrepreneurship Minor
    The entrepreneurship minor is designed for those students who are interested in starting their own business or to enhance a business that they are currently working in.

    The course content of the minor is designed to meet the objective of developing the mindset, skills, competencies and experiential learning that enable students to function as entrepreneurs or as productive members of emerging, entrepreneurial firms.

    The Entrepreneurship Program integrates the knowledge and experiences gained in other disciplines, as well as from the field of entrepreneurship, into an understanding of the process of new venture creation and the management of entrepreneurial businesses. With the minor presenting entrepreneurial concepts from a generalist perspective, students will acquire knowledge to conceive, develop and launch new ventures and to turn innovative ideas into products that can be brought to market. Emphasis is placed on the managerial, legal, and marketing aspects of start-up businesses. The program culminates with a juried business plan competition for financial backing and start-up funding support.

    • Ethical and Legal -- In addition to exploring legal issues associated with a small business, students will examine their own personal values and aspirations to help guide their entrepreneurial careers.
    • Knowing the numbers -- Entrepreneurs must be intimately familiar with the financial health of their businesses, particularly in regard to cash flow and other limited resource management and forecasting.
    • Business Model -- Students will be expected to develop a full understanding of how to create and utilize a business model and transform it into a fundable business plan.
    • Selling the idea -- Students must not only understand how to identify and evaluate potential investors, but also how to sell their business idea when the opportunity presents itself.
    • Managing growth in entrepreneurial companies -- Students will learn the unique set of leadership and communication skills necessary to guide a company through its most perilous time period: rapid growth.

    Courses:

    • BUS 401 Introduction to Entrepreneurship
    • BUS 453: Leadership for Management:
    • BUS 565: Sales and Sales Management
    • BUS 550: Business Law
    • BUS 600 New Venture Creation

    Students will also be encouraged to take advantage of internship opportunities at the ABI Innovation hub in Manchester and within the UNH Emerging Technology Center located on campus. Entrepreneurship majors are strongly encouraged to become active members in the ENACTUS program which focuses on helping entrepreneurs in the Manchester community.

  • Faculty

    staff photo

    Kelly Kilcrease

    Program Coordinator and Associate Professor
    Business Program
    Social Science Division
    University Center
    603-641-4186
    Kelly.Kilcrease@unh.edu

    staff photo

    Walter Alderman

    Instructor of Business
    Business Program
    Social Science Division
    University Center
    603-641-4117
    Walter.Alderman@unh.edu

    staff photo

    Thomas Birch

    Professor of Economics
    Business Program
    Social Science Division
    University Center
    603-641-4108
    Thomas.Birch@unh.edu

    staff photo

    Todd Bohan

    Adjunct Faculty Member
    Business Program
    University Center
    603-773-6473
    Todd.Bohan@unh.edu

    staff photo

    William Troy

    Lecturer of Business and Internship Coordinator for Business
    Business Program
    Social Science Division
    University Center
    603-641-4345
    Bill.Troy@unh.edu

  • Course Sequence

    The following is an example of a course sequence. The sequence may vary depending upon a student's academic history and transfer credits. Students should contact their academic advisor with specific questions.

    First Year

    Fall semester
    ENGL 401, Freshman English, or Inquiry Course
    Foreign Language
    Quantitative Reasoning course
    BUS 400, Introduction to Business

    Spring Semester
    ENGL 401, Freshman English, or Inquiry Course
    Foreign Language
    Discovery Course
    ECN 411, Introduction to Macro Economics

    Second Year

    Fall Semester
    ECN 412, Introduction to Micro Economics
    BUS 532, Introduction to Financial Accounting
    Discovery Course
    Discovery Course

    Spring Semester
    BUS 533, Introduction to Managerial Accounting
    Business Concentration Course
    Discovery Course
    Discovery Course

    Third Year

    Fall Semester
    BUS 430, Business Statistics
    CIS 411, Introduction to Computers
    Business Concentration Course
    Discovery Course

    Spring Semester
    BUS 601, Financial Management
    CIS 510, Computer Info Systems
    Business Concentration course
    Discovery Course

    Fourth Year

    Fall Semester
    BUS 620, Organizational Behavior
    BUS 610, Marketing Principles
    Business Concentration course
    Discovery Course

    Spring Semester
    BUS 701, Business, Government & Society
    BUS 750/760, Business Seminar
    Elective Course
    Elective Course

  • Career Facts

    A Business degree opens doors to a vast number of career opportunities. The skills learned through the study of Business are readily transferable to an array of occupations including accounting, marketing, management, and public service.

    The study of Business develops skills critical to a large number of career fields. These qualities include:

    • Effective oral and written communication skills
    • Organizational skills
    • Leadership experience in various environments
    • Management of time and resources
    • Ability to use systems thinking to understand difficult material
    • Technical skills to organize and analyze data

    Make the most of your major:

    • Have a fair balance each term between the quantitative and qualitative courses.
    • Always seek help early.
    • Consider courses that require a lot of writing.
    • Enroll in courses where presentations are required.
    • Be active and gain practical experience via internships.
    • Join professional associations related to your major.
    • Find a faculty member to serve as a mentor.
    • Participate in the UNH Undergraduate Research Conference.

    What you can do with this degree

    • Accounting
    • Bond broker
    • Business analyst
    • Business development manager
    • Consulting
    • Credit analyst
  • Student Stories

  • Course Descriptions

    Click on each course title to read the full description. For all courses offered at our campus, click here

      BUS 400 - Introduction to Business

      Introduces the study of business: examines the origins and development of American business, its place in a global economy, and its legal and ethical roles in modern society. Includes an overview of the functional areas of business such as finance, marketing, and organizational behavior. Designed for business majors as well as for students considering a major in business.
      Credits: 4

      BUS 401 - Introduction to Entrepreneurship

      The course will explore the structure and framework of entrepreneurial endeavors, both inside and outside the business world. Focus will include starting and structuring a business, finance/accounting (including financing the venture), marketing, managing, and online business technology. Questions to be addressed will include: What is entrepreneurship? What is opportunity recognition and selection? How can you create and define competitive advantage? How can you think about people in the entrepreneurial context? How can you garner support (financial and other) for an entrepreneurial venture? What do you do when nothing works as planned? And how do you focus on doing right and doing well?
      Credits: 4

      BUS 410 - Intro to Entrepreneurship

      This course explores the structure and framework of entrepreneurial endeavors, both inside and outside of the business world. Questions to be addressed include: What is entrepreneurship? What is opportunity recognition and selection? How can you create and define connective advantage? How can you think about people in the entrepreneurial context? How can you garner support (financial and other) for an entrepreneurial venture? What do you do when nothing works as planned?
      Credits: 4

      BUS 430 - Intro to Business Statistics

      The use of statistical methods for managerial decision making. Emphasis is on understanding concepts, including inferences from sample data and model formulation, as aids in decision-making. Lab: Using class-focused statistics problems, designed to provide opportunity to develop course-specific problem solving strategies; to adapt from mathematical to statistical thinking; to analyze and communicate significance and meaning of numerical outcomes; to develop course-specific test taking prowess. No credit for students who have received credit for BIOL 528; ADMN 420; EREC 525; HHS 540; MATH 639; MATH 644; PSYC 402; SOC 502. 4 cr. Successful completion of MATH 420 or MATH 425 or equivalent is strongly recommended prior to enrolling in this course.
      Credits: 4

      BUS 430 - Intro to Business Stats Lab

      Using class-focused statistics problems, designed to provide opportunity to develop course-specific problem solving strategies; to adapt from mathematical to statistical thinking; to analyze and communicate significance and meaning of numerical outcomes; to develop course-specific test taking prowess. Students enrolled in ADM 430 are strongly urged to enroll in this lab.

      BUS 453 - Leadership for Managers

      This course provides the critical element of analytical and intellectual examination and reflection of certain core issues in the practice of leadership. These objectives are achieved through open discussion, honest self-assessment, experiential exercises, and observation of real-life leadership practice. What is valued in this course are honest relationships and dialogue, risk-taking, dedication to the topic of leadership, initiative, and exploring the confusion and gray areas involved in these topics. Prereq: BUS 400.
      Credits: 4

      BUS 455 - Management of Human Resources Management

      This course emphasizes the development of skills for dealing with selected aspects of human resource management. It aims to enhance the students' ability to apply theoretical concepts and alternative approaches for dealing with common issues concerning the human side of the enterprise. The course is geared to serve the needs of line and staff administrators in supervisory positions. Thus, it strives to train students and facilitate the development of better understanding of human resources issues as they relate to other managerial functions, organizational behavior, and the ability of managers and the organization to achieve prescribed goals. Prereq: BUS 400 or permission of instructor.
      Credits: 4

      BUS 492 - American Business History

      This course explores the historical development of American business institutions from the colonial era to the present. Thematic units organize the material focusing in turn on the most significant developments in the American business environment. The goal is a cumulative understanding of the development of the system. A great deal of our discussion and reading will center on the interaction of market operations and social values and how these interactions influenced the business environment at different times. It is the study of business in the context of past times that makes this course different from a course in business methods or institutions. Through the study of the past students will develop their critical thinking and writing skills.
      Credits: 4

      BUS 520 - Training and Development

      Students interested in career options in training and development of human resources development learn some of the theoretical bases, core practices, competencies, and issues of this professional field, as well as considerations for global training and development. They are exposed to research and discoveries on skills and knowledge related to training and adult learning, and models for effective training. They learn the most current trends and issues in international training and development, including the push for management and leadership training for intercultural understanding. Prereq: BUS 400, BUS 455, or permission from instructor.
      Credits: 4

      BUS 532 - Intro to Financial Accounting

      Fundamental concepts of accounting and their impact on the business world and society as a whole. Emphasis on the recording of economic transactions, and preparation and analysis of financial statements. No credit for students who have had ACFI 501, 502, ADMN 502.
      Credits: 4

      BUS 533 - Intro to Managerial Accounting

      Emphasizes how organizational managers use accounting information to support their functions of planning, control, and decision-making. Examples taken from corporations, small business, and not-for-profit organizations. No credit for students who have received credit for ACFI 503, ADMN 503. Prereq: ADM 532.
      Credits: 4

      BUS 550 - Business Law

      This course explores the legal environment in which businesses operate and studies the interaction between business and the legal system. Students examine various areas of the law which are integral to operating a business enterprise. Topics include contracts, torts, agency, Uniform Commercial Code, ethical and criminal implications of business actions, property laws, and the legal aspects of different business entities. Business owners, managers, accountants, paralegals, and all those seeking to gain or broaden their general understanding of the legal system should benefit from this course. Prereq: BUS 400.
      Credits: 4

      BUS 565 - Selling and Sales Management

      The course will cover both the strategies, and the tactics, of selling, from the wide ranging perspectives of: the sales person, the sales manager, and the customer. Management topics will include: motivation and behavior, sales methodologies, channel optimization, recruiting and selecting representatives, training, compensation, and evaluation. We will also cover sales tactics such as: prospecting and sales call planning, communicating the sales message, negotiating for win-win situations, overcoming objections, closing the sale, and follow-up management.

      The course includes a great deal of in-class practice and balanced feedback. Each student will have 4 scenarios to prepare for: A job interview, a sales to a consumer, a business to business sale, and a 'capstone' business to business team sale. There are also 2 exams. Pre-requisites are Junior status. ADM 400 and 610, or equivalent, would be useful, not required.
      Credits: 4

      BUS 600 - New Venture Creation

      An opportunity for students to identify and create a new business via a business plan. Elements of a business plan will be presented as well a review of the other entrepreneurial courses that make up the minor. Formal exams, discussions, research, and case analysis will be used to assess student knowledge toward innovation, idea generation, venture financing, financial analysis of projects, market research, industry analysis and the strategic planning process.
      Credits: 4

      BUS 601 - Financial Management

      Study of investment, finance, and dividend decisions of the business firm. Topics include capital budgeting, designing and issuing securities, management of working capital and evaluating manager performance. Prereq: completion of Introductory Business Core or permission.
      Credits: 4

      BUS 610 - Marketing Principles & Applications

      Studies the process of planning and distributing goods and services to the marketplace. Topics include product planning, pricing, promotion, and distribution. Emphasis on the application of marketing principles to real world business cases. Prereq: ADM 400, ECN 412.
      Credits: 4

      BUS 620 - Organizational Behavior

      Applications of behavioral science concepts to work settings. Topics include worker incentives and perceptions toward work, group versus individual decision making, conflict resolution, interpersonal and leadership skills, and the study of other behaviors relevant to effective managing of a business organization. Prereq: Completion of Introductory Business Core or permission. Special fee.
      Credits: 4

      BUS 630 - International Management

      This course introduces students to the world of international business and management by studying cultural influences, government, and business structures in our global economy. Students also learn about trade relations, international finance and legal and labor agreements. Also covered, are topics on information needs, production systems, marketing and promotion, and career planning. Prereq: Introduction to Business.
      Credits: 4

      BUS 635 - Students in Free Enterprise

      This is a two credit project driven course aimed at teaching students an understanding of free enterprise through the application of economic activities within the community. In addition, students will have special topic sessions on leadership, time management, public speaking, project management, and fundraising. Emphasis on teamwork. Course is open to all students who have junior or senior level standing, in and out of the business program. Prereq: junior or senior level standing. Special fee. Course may be repeated to a maximum of 12 credits.
      Credits: 2

      BUS 640 - Business Communication and Conflict

      This course is designed to give students a comprehensive view of communication, its scope and importance in business, and the role of communication in establishing a favorable outside the firm environment as well as an affective internal communications program. The various types of business communication media are covered. This course also develops an awareness of the importance of succinct written expression to modern business communication. Prereq: Completion of Introduction to Business Core and BUS 455; or Approval by instructor.
      Credits: 4

      BUS 650 - Operations Management

      Studies the operational issues and problems related to the design and implementation of an organization's production process. Topics include production planning and analysis, inventory and quality control, scheduling, and methods for evaluating production performance in both the goods and service sectors of the economy. Prereq: Completion of Introductory Business Core or permission.
      Credits: 4

      BUS 660 - Employment and Labor Law

      This course includes a study of the organizational rights of employees and unions and the governance of the use of economic force by employers and unions. Also studied is the duty to bargain collectively, the manner in which collective bargaining is conducted, and the subjects to which it extends, as well as the manner in which collective bargaining agreements are administered and enforced. The relationship between a union and its members is also treated. Prereq: Completion of Introduction to Business Core and BUS 455.
      Credits: 4

      BUS 661 - Integrated Marketing Communications

      Integrated Marketing Communications (IMC) is a fast evolving field in business and marketing. Traditionally called “Advertising Principles”, the techniques, models, and media are as varied as the ultimate consumer, and are evolving rapidly to narrowcasting to audiences of one, not millions.

      The course covers the full spectrum of planning, budgeting, data collection and analysis, creative tools and models, including perspectives on both Business to Consumer, and Business to Business, IMC. Included are special approaches for: cultural, lifestyle and ethnic sensitivity, global versus individual country tactics, and the fast evolving techniques of social and mobile marketing. All of the above are in the context of building brands and customer loyalty. Pre-requisites are ADM 400 and ADM 610.
      Credits: 4

      BUS 663 - Services Marketing and Operations Management

      New Hampshire is one of the most dependent on Services related industries for income and employment growth, across the entire United States, representing 90% of all jobs in the state.

      Services Marketing and Operations Management (SMOM) is a fast growing field in business and marketing. Traditionally called "Services Marketing", it encompasses a wide range of techniques and models that are increasingly focused not just on planning and communicating with the target market, but on ongoing improvement of the delivery of services to the ultimate consumer, using models such as Gaps Analysis and Servqual ™.

      While there are some lectures, the course emphasizes many case studies, student exploration through diaries of service encounters, and a major paper delineating trends in an industry of interest, relevant to both the United States and New Hampshire. There is a special emphasis on student application of SMOM tools to analyzing their work places, to improve application of knowledge. Pre-requisites are ADM 400 and ADM 610


      Credits: 4

      BUS 665 - International Marketing Strategy

      The primary missions of the International Marketing Strategy Management course are to help students to: (1) develop understanding and knowledge of the important role International marketing plays in business, (2) develop and improve global thinking, problem solving and integrative skills in a case based context (3) learn and apply the varying tools and models for evaluating when, where and how international marketing investments should be made. (4) understand and implement special approaches for cultural and ethnic differences in taste and attitudes, including trade legalities and regulations.

      All of the above are in the context of building internationally successful brands and customer loyalty, through assessment of global versus individual country tactics, applying the latest marketing techniques, and leveraging outsourced logistics systems for micro businesses.
      Credits: 4

      BUS 675 - Special Topics in Business Administration

      Provides students with an opportunity to explore a topic in business administration such as marketing, management, finance, or accounting. Topics will vary. Barring duplication of subject, may be repeated for credit.
      Credits: 4

      BUS 685 - Applications in Business Management

      Selected topics. Topics will vary. Barring duplication of subject, may be repeated for credit.
      Credits: 4

      BUS 695 - Independent Study in Business

      Independent study exploring a special topic emphasizing the managerial, organizational, strategic, political or economic context(s) within which business decisions are made. Prereq: ADM 400 and permission of instructor.
      Credits: 1-4

      BUS 701 - Business, Government and Society

      Examines relationships between business and the broader social, political and economic contexts within which business operates. Topics include business ethics, the social responsibilities of business, the impact of globalization on business, the impact on various government policies on business, and how business influences government. Prereq: senior standing, ADM 620, or permission. Writing Intensive.
      Credits: 4

      BUS 750 - Business Internship Seminar

      A seminar course where students report on and discuss their business internship experiences. Course revolves around selected group readings as well as both written and oral presentations by students. Prereq: senior standing or permission. Prereq: ADM 620 and senior standing or permission.
      Credits: 4

      BUS 755 - Co-op Program

      This is a program that enables students to integrate classroom learning with practical, professional, experience in their field of study. Students majoring in professional and liberal arts programs experience the working world through an educationally managed agreement between the employer, the student, and the institution. Students need to have a minimum 3.0 cummulative GPA and have junior or senior level status.
      Credits: 1

      BUS 760 - Applied Senior Project

      An independent study research project involving an in-depth exploration into a business topic chosen by the student in consultation with a faculty member. Especially designed for students with an extensive prior work experience. Prereq: ADM 620 and senior standing or permission.
      Credits: 4

      BUS 770 - Special Topics Senior Seminar

      An in-depth exploration into both the theoretical and applied aspects of a special business topic. Topics vary according to instructor. Prereq: ADM 620 and senior standing or permission.
      Credits: 4

      ECN 410 - History of Literary Economics

      An examination of the contributions of fiction writers to the history of economic thought. Novels and short stories are analyzed in conjunction with studying influential and heterodox schools of economic thought. Fiction writers will vary by semester (e.g., Mark Twain, Edith Wharton, Charlotte Perkins Gilman, Theodore Dreiser, Jack London, Ayn Rand, F. Scott Fitzgerald and Louisa May Alcott). Schools of economic thought examined include critics as well as advocates of free market capitalism.
      Credits: 4

      ECN 411 - Introduction to Macroeconomic Principles

      Studies how an economy functions. Develops measures and theories of economic performance to study such issues as unemployment, inflation, international trade and finance, and the level of national production. Examines government policies designed to correct for unemployment and inflation with close attention to the use of fiscal and monetary policies in the U.S. No credit for students who have received credit for ECON 401. 411W is writing intensive.
      Credits: 4

      ECN 411W - Introduction to Macroeconomic Principles

      Studies how an economy functions. Develops measures and theories of economic performance to study such issues as unemployment, inflation, international trade and finance, and the level of national production. Examines government policies designed to correct for unemployment and inflation with close attention to the use of fiscal and monetary policies in the U.S. No credit for students who have received credit for ECON 401. Writing Intensive.
      Credits: 4

      ECN 412 - Introduction to Microeconomic Principles

      Studies the behavior and interaction of fundamental decision-making units in an economy, especially consumers and business firms. Applies such economic principles as scarcity, supply and demand, and elasticity to a variety of social issues. Topics include the resource allocation problems of households and business firms, economic theories of social problems (such as crime, divorce and discrimination), and the economic implications of government policies affecting the environment, the workplace, and industrial organization. No credit for students who have received credit for ECON 402. 412W is writing intensive.
      Credits: 4

      ECN 412W - Introduction to Microeconomic Principles

      Studies the behavior and interaction of fundamental decision-making units in an economy, especially consumers and business firms. Applies such economic principles as scarcity, supply and demand, and elasticity to a variety of social issues. Topics include the resource allocation problems of households and business firms, economic theories of social problems (such as crime, divorce, and discrimination), and the economic implications of government policies affecting the environment, the workplace, and industrial organization. No credit for students who have received credit for ECON 402. Writing Intensive.
      Credits: 4

      ECN 444 - Power

      What is "power"? How does it originate and influence events? Are there, or should there be, limits to power? How does power (or powerlessness) manifest itself within your life and community? This semester we will explore the concept of "power", including its sources, deployment and effects, using a variety of sources, methods, and disciplinary perspectives. To raise and address questions about power, we will carefully read, view, discuss and listen to primary source material related to our topic including texts, film, art and music. Course content includes the perspective of philosophers (Friedrich Nietzsche, Thomas Hobbes), dramatists (Samuel Beckett, Christopher Marlowe) scientists (Rene Descartes, Albert Einstein), essayists (Ralph Waldo Emerson), autoenographers (Carolina Maria DeJesus), as well as the work of historians, economists, psychologists, and scholars working in the fields of communication and gender studies. In addition students will design a service learning project(s) to research aspects of power and/or powerlessness within their life and community. Writing intensive. Group 8.
      Credits: 4

      ECN 635 - Money, Bank & Macroeconomic Activity

      A study of the financial sector of the economy including commercial banks, thrifts, and other depository institutions. Examines the meaning and determinants of the money supply, credit and interest rates. Close attention paid to the role of the Federal Reserve and the economic effects of its monetary policy. Prereq: ECN 411, ECN 412.
      Credits: 4

      ECN 640 - Business Law and Economics

      A study of the legal environment of business. Emphasis is on using economic analysis to examine laws of property, contract, and tort affecting business. Includes the ethical foundations of law and ethical issues involving business. Specific topics may include commercial free speech, white collar crime and managerial responsibility, product liability, cyberlaw, copyright, trademark and patent law. Prereq: ADM 400, ECN 412, and sophomore standing or permission of the instructor. Writing intensive.
      Credits: 4

      ECN 650 - Economics for Managers

      Examines how economic principles can be applied to resource allocation problems confronted by managers in a variety of industry settings. Emphasis on both theory and application. Topics include cost analysis, production decisions, and pricing policies of business managers within perfectly competitive, monopolistic, oligopolistic, and monopolistically competitive environments. Prereq: ADM 400, ECN 412 and sophomore standing or permission of instructor.
      Credits: 4