• About this program

    Join us for a Psychology program Info Session on Thursday, Nov. 20 at 3:00 p.m. Click here to RSVP today to reserve your seat!

    Psychology is the scientific study of behavior. The UNH Manchester psychology program provides students with a broad background in psychology, introducing them to both the experimental and clinical perspectives in the field. Students majoring in psychology will explore the fundamental principles involved in how people and animals learn and adapt to their environments.

    The psychology program, through its independent study and internship programs, offers opportunities for participation in cooperating New Hampshire mental health, human services, and rehabilitation facilities. Students have worked in hospitals, halfway houses, mental health centers, and other agencies. The department also invites guest speakers to discuss important issues in the field.

    Psychology graduates find employment as trained research assistants, mental health aides in a wide variety of human services agencies, social welfare caseworkers, teachers in special education programs, and professionals in government, business, and industry. It is normally expected that students who wish to do professional work in the field of psychology will pursue graduate training at the M.A., M.S., Ph.D., or Psy.D. level.

    For more information about the psychology program, contact Gary Goldstein, program coordinator, (603) 641-4179, or e-mail gary.goldstein@unh.edu. Or contact the UNH Manchester Office of Admissions at (603) 641-4150, e-mail unhm.admissions@unh.edu

  • Program of Study

    Students majoring in psychology must complete a minimum of 128 credits, satisfy the University’s Discovery Program and foreign language requirements and complete 44 credits with a minimum of C- in each course and a 2.0 overall grade-point average in all major requirements.

    Transfer students who elect to major in psychology must complete at least 24 credits in the program at UNH/UNH Manchester to qualify for the degree in psychology. Transfer students must earn a total of 44 approved credits for completion of the psychology major. The department’s academic advisors will determine the distribution of these credits. Transfer students should note that courses are allotted only the number of credits granted by the original institution (after adjustments for semester-hour equivalents). Thus, students transferring from an institution at which courses carry less than four credits each must make up for any credit deficit created by acceptance of transfer credits into the psychology major.

    Specific course selections should be discussed with the advisor. Exceptions to the requirements for the major require a petition to the department.

    Course Sequencing

    First Year

    Fall Semester
    English 401
    PSYC 401
    Discovery
    Elective

    Spring Semester
    Discovery
    PSYC 402
    PSYC 500 Group 1 or 2
    Elective

    Second Year

    Fall Semester
    Foreign Language 1
    Discovery
    PSYC 502 (Inquiry Attribute)
    PSYC 500 Group 1 or 2

    Spring Semester
    Foreign Language 2
    Discovery
    PSYC 500 Group 1 or 2
    Discovery

    Third Year

    Fall Semester
    PSYC 500 Group 1 or 2
    Discovery
    PSYC 700 Group 1 or 24
    Discovery

    Spring Semester
    PSYC 700 Group 1 or 2
    PSYC 700 Group 1 or 2
    Discovery
    Elective

    Fourth Year

    Fall Semester
    Discovery
    PSYC 700 Group 1 or 2
    Capstone or Elective
    Elective

    Spring Semester
    Capstone or Elective
    Elective
    Elective
    Elective

    Program Requirements

    A. Three core courses (PSYC 401, 402, and 502)

    B. Four 500-level breadth courses, as follows:
    Group I: Two courses:
    PSYC 511, PSYC 512, PSYC 513, PSYC 521, PSYC 522, PSYC 531
    Group II: Two courses:
    PSYC 552, PSYC 553, PSYC 561, PSYC 571, PSYC 581, PSYC 582

    C. Four 700-level depth courses, as follows:
    Group I: One or more:
    PSYCH 702, 705, 710, 712, 713, 720, 722, 731, 733, 735, 737, 741A-D

    Group II: One or more:
    PSYC 702, 705, 755, 756, 758, 762, 763, 765, 771, 780, 783, 785, 791A-G, 793
    PSYC 702 and PSYC 705 may be substituted for a group I or group II course, but they may not both be used to fill the same group.

    D. Capstone Requirement:
    PSYC 793 or PSYC 795 w/ UNHM URC presentation or
    Capstone Seminar (pending)

    PSYC 793 and a designated capstone seminar courses may also fulfill a 700-level course

    The Durham psychology major has slightly different requirements. Students who plan to transfer to Durham should consult with their advisor.

  • Minor

    Psychology Minor

    The minor in psychology consists of five psychology department courses (20 credits), including PSYC 401 and at least two courses at the 500 level or above. No more than four credits of PSYC 795 may be applied to the minor. Each course must be passed with a grade of C- or better, with an overall minimum grade point average of 2.0 for the five minor courses. No pass/fail or credit/fail courses may be applied toward the minor. Under no circumstances can more than 9 transfer credits be applied toward the minor.

    For more information contact Gary Goldstein, Minor Supervisor, at 603-641-4179.

  • Facilities & Equipment

    Sensation and Perception Laboratory

    The Sensation and Perception Laboratory at UNH Manchester is a multi-purpose teaching and research laboratory geared mainly toward the area of research in visual perception. Students enrolled in various upper-level courses and independent study projects conduct experiments and demonstrations in the areas of perceptual psychology and visual cognition. This experience gives students first-hand experience of the experimental paradigms that are presented in their classes. In addition to course-related experiences, student/faculty research projects in the areas of motion and depth perception are carried out in the facility. Students get to experience conducting hands-on research under laboratory conditions, which helps them to gain entrance into competitive graduate programs in psychology. Students present results of their original research at the annual UNH Manchester Undergraduate Research Conference and other regional conferences.

    Laboratory facilities include:

    • Windows- and Macintosh-based computers used to conduct laboratory experiments.
    • Adjustable observer seat with headrest for precise positioning in front of a high-definition LCD display screen.
    • Hardware and software for projecting three-dimensional (3-D) graphics.
    • Computer-controlled LED-based colorimeter currently being constructed for work in color-naming and color-matching experiments.

    For more information, contact: Gary Goldstein, Psychology Program Coordinator 603-641-4179 or gsg@unh.edu

  • Faculty

    staff photo

    Gary Goldstein

    Division Chair, Program Coordinator and Associate Professor
    Psychology Program
    Social Science Division
    University Center
    603-641-4179
    Gary.Goldstein@unh.edu

    staff photo

    Alison Paglia

    Associate Professor
    Psychology Program
    Social Science Division
    University Center
    603-641-4103
    Alison.Paglia@unh.edu

    staff photo

    Daniel Seichepine

    Lecturer of Psychology
    Psychology Program
    Social Science Division
    University Center
    641-4356
    Daniel.Seichepine@unh.edu

    staff photo

    John Sparrow

    Associate Professor
    Psychology Program
    Social Science Division
    University Center
    603-641-4151
    John.Sparrow@unh.edu

  • Course Sequence

    The following is an example of a course sequence. The sequence may vary depending upon a student's academic history and transfer credits. Students should contact their academic advisor with specific questions.

    First Year

    Fall Semester
    UMST 401, First Year Semina
    English 401, First Year Writing
    PSYC 401, Introduction to Psychology
    Discovery Course
    Elective Course

    Spring Semester
    PSYC 402, Statistics in Psychology
    PSYC 500 Level Course
    Discovery Course
    Elective Course

    Second Year

    Fall Semester
    PSYC 502, Research Methods in Psychology
    PSYC 500 Level Course
    Foreign Language I
    Discovery Course

    Spring Semester
    PSYC 500 Level Course
    Foreign Language II
    Discovery Course
    Discovery Course

    Third Year

    Fall Semester
    PSYC 500 Level Course
    PSYC 700 Level Course
    Discovery Course
    Discovery Course

    Spring Semester
    PSYC 700 Level Course
    PSYC 700 Level Course
    Discovery Course
    Elective Course

    Fourth Year

    Fall Semester
    PSYC 700 Level Course/Capstone
    Elective Course
    Elective Course
    Elective Course

    Spring Semester
    PSYC Course, any level
    Elective Course
    Elective Course
    Elective Course

  • Career Facts

    Many think a degree in Psychology is only for those thinking about careers in counseling or social work. It fact, this liberal arts degree opens doors to many careers requiring an understanding of human behavior and solid communication skills. Occupational opportunities include human services, business management, research, law, sales, human resources and education.

    The study of Psychology develops skills necessary for a large number of career fields. These qualities include:

    • Critical and creative thinking
    • Effective interpersonal skills
    • Research, organization and editing
    • An understanding of group dynamics
    • Analysis of data
    • Motivational and mediating techniques
    • Eff ective questioning, reasoning and responding skills

    Sample career possibilities

  • Student Stories

  • Course Descriptions

    Click on each course title to read the full description. For all courses offered at our campus, click here

      PSYC 401 - Introduction to Psychology

      Psychology as a behavioral science; its theoretical and applied aspects. Content includes research methods, behavioral neuroscience, sensation and perception, cognition, learning, development, personality, psychopathology, and social psychology. To experience actively the nature of psychological research students have an opportunity to participate in a variety of studies as part of a laboratory experience.
      Credits: 4

      PSYC 402 - Statistics in Psychology

      Design, statistical analysis, and decision making in psychological research. Probability, hypothesis-testing, and confidence intervals. Conceptualization, computation, interpretation, and typical applications for exploratory data analysis (including measures of central tendency, variability), t-tests, correlations, bivariate regression, one-way analysis of variance, and chi square. Introduction to computer methods of computation. No credit for students who have completed ADM 430; BIOL 528; DS 420; EREC 525; HHS 540; MATH 639; MATH 644; SOC 502.
      Credits: 4

      PSYC 502 - Research Methods in Psychology

      Research design, including experimental and correlation design; internal versus external validity; measurement; writing a research report; graphic and statistical methods for summarizing data; sampling; and special problems such as experimenter effects, reactivity of measurement, and others. The use of hypothesis testing and data analysis in research. Prereq: PSYC 401 and 402. Writing intensive.
      Credits: 4

      PSYC 511 - Sensation and Perception

      The study of how humans (and some other animals) sense and perceive their environment. Topics include seeing (vision), hearing (audition), tasting (gustation), smelling (olfaction), feeling (somatosensation), and the variety of state-of-the-art methods used by psychologists to study these senses. Illusions and other sensory and perceptual phenomena are treated. Prereq: PSYC 401.
      Credits: 4

      PSYC 513 - Cognitive Psychology

      The study of human cognition, its basic concepts, methods, and major findings. Human knowledge acquisition and use. Attention; perception; memory; imagery; language; reading; problem solving; and decision making. Prereq: PSYC 401
      Credits: 4

      PSYC 521 - Behavior Analysis

      Principles derived from the experimental study of human and animal learning and their theoretical integration. Respondent and operant conditioning. Reinforcement and punishment; stimulus control; choice and preference; conditioned reinforcement. Prereq: PSYC 401.
      Credits: 4

      PSYC 522 - Behaviorism

      Introduction to behaviorism as a philosophy of science. Some historical background, but concentration on modern behaviorism as exemplified in the works of B. F. Skinner. No credit for students who have completed PSYC 722. Offered only in Manchester. Prereq: PSYC 401.
      Credits: 4

      PSYC 531 - Psychobiology

      Introduction to the behavioral neurosciences. Surveys research conducted by psychologists to learn about the biological basis of behavior: development, sensation, perception, movement, sleep, feeding, drinking, hormones, reproduction, stress, emotions, emotional disorders, learning, and memory. Prereq: PSYC 401
      Credits: 4

      PSYC 552 - Social Psychology

      Behavior of individuals as affected by other individuals, groups, and society. Topics include attitude change and social influence, conformity, social interaction, interpersonal attraction, impression formation, research. Prereq: PSYC 401.
      Credits: 4

      PSYC 553 - Personality

      Major theories, methods of assessment, and research. Prereq: PSYC 401.
      Credits: 4

      PSYC 561 - Abnormal Behavior

      Causes, diagnosis, and treatment of abnormal behavior. Implications of varying theoretical viewpoints. Prereq: PSYC 401.
      Credits: 4

      PSYC 571 - Pioneers of Psychology

      An introduction to the development and evolution of psychology as an academic discipline and applied science. The lives and works of innovators in psychology are placed in socio-political context.
      Credits: 4

      PSYC 581 - Child Development

      The developing child in the context of his/her society. Current problems in, and influences on, development of the child. Personality and cognitive development; exceptional children. Prereq: PSYC 401.
      Credits: 4

      PSYC 582 - Adult Development and Aging

      A life-span developmental framework for the study of growth, decline, and stability on adult development. Developmental methods in adult development research; biological basis for aging; patterns of change and stability in diverse domains of psychological functioning, e.g., perception, cognition, intellectual performance, and personality organization. Prereq: PSYC 401.
      Credits: 4

      PSYC 705 - Tests and Measurements

      Testing intelligence, creativity, achievement, interests, and personality. Test construction; evaluation; relation to psychological theory, research, and practice. Prereq: PSYC 402; 502;/or permission.
      Credits: 4

      PSYC 710 - Visual Perception

      The study of how humans (and some other animals) see. Topics include color vision, depth perception, form and pattern vision, visual learning and development, eye movements, diseases of the visual system, illusions, and other visual phenomena. Prereq: PSYC 402; 502; 531; or permission. Writing intensive.
      Credits: 4

      PSYC 711 - Sensation and Perception

      Anatomy, physiology, psychophysics, and perceptual processes of the visual, auditory, gustatory, olfactory, and cutaneous senses. Topics include stimulus definition, psychophysics, sensory transduction, sensory and perceptual adaptation, neural coding of space, time, magnitude, and quality. Prereq: PSYC 402; 502; 531; or permission. Writing intensive.
      Credits: 4

      PSYC 712 - Psychology of Language

      Theories of language structure, functions of human language, meaning, relationship of language to other mental processes, language acquisition, indices of language development, speech perception, reading. Prereq: PSYC 402; 502; 512; or 513; or permission. Writing intensive.
      Credits: 4

      PSYC 713 - Psychology of Consciousness

      This course explores questions of consciousness--What is it? How does it develop? Are infants and animals conscious? Why did consciousness evolve? Includes a review of historical background, including the ideas of Jaynes, Paiget, James, Freud, and others. Contemporary topics may may include the role of language and other representational systems, blindsight, subliminal perception, priming and other implicit cognitive phenomena, hypnosis, confabluation and attribution, dreaming, multiple personality and conceptions of self and free will, from simultaneous perspectives of phenomenology, behavior, and neuroscience. Specific topics governed by class interests. Prereq: PSYC 402; 502; 512; or 513; or permission. Writing intensive.
      Credits: 4

      PSYC 722 - Behaviorism , Culture and Contemporary Society

      Introduces behaviorism as a philosophy of science. Concentration on modern behaviorism as exemplified in the works of B.F. Skinner. Implications of behaviorism for the development and evolution of cultures. Consideration of societal issues (for example pollution, overpopulation, conflict, drug abuse) from a behavioral framework. Prereq: PSYC 402; 502; 521;/or permission. No credit for students who have completed PSYC 522. Writing intensive.
      Credits: 4

      PSYC 741 - Advanced Topics

      Advanced material in which instructor has specialized knowledge through research and study. May be repeated for different offerings. Topics under this listing may be used to fulfill a major requirement in category CI. A) Psychology as a Natural Science B) Cognition; C) Behavior Analysis; D) Biological/Sensory. Prereq: PSYC 402; 502; plus other prerequisites when offered; or permission. Writing intensive.
      Credits: 4

      PSYC 758 - Health Psychology

      Survey of current topics in health psychology, including: social stress and the etiology of disease; Type A and other personality factors related to health; modification of risk factors; the practitioner-patient relationship; chronic pain; and the emotional impact of life-threatening illness. Prereq: 402; 502; or permission. Writing intensive.
      Credits: 4

      PSYC 762 - Counseling

      Theories of counseling; ethical considerations; professional and paraprofessional activities in a variety of work settings. Prereq: PSYC 402, 502; 553, or 561; or permission. Writing intensive.
      Credits: 4

      PSYC 791 - Advanced Topics

      Adult Development is an in-depth multidimensional approach to the study of aging, focusing on the gains and losses associated with aging. Observations related to adult development will be made during weekly community service visits. The community service will be conducted outside of class time, approximately 1.5 hours each week at a site in Manchester selected by the instructor. There is the opportunity for the community service to be conducted during the day, evening, or on weekends. Students will conduct the community service at the same time each week. A variety of course concepts will be applied to the student on-site experiences through research projects, student reflection, and class discussion. Students who are seniors interested in taking this course to fulfill the capstone requirement will be required to begin a new activity on-site that will require weekly planning and preparation and will have modified course assignments. All students will be required to have a TB test and background check; the site will provide and pay for both.
      Credits: 4

      PSYC 793 - Internship

      Supervised practicum in one of several cooperating New Hampshire mental health/rehabilitation facilities. Coursework knowledge applied to meaningful work and team experience. Commitment includes a negotiated number of weekly work hours and weekly seminars. Supervision by institution personnel and the instructor. A maximum of 4 credits may be applied to the psychology major. Prereq: permission; PSYC major; PSYC 402; 502; 561; additional psychology courses desirable.
      Credits: 4-8

      PSYC 795 - Independent Study

      A) physiological; B) perception; C) history and theory; D) behavioral analysis; E) social; F) cognition; G) statistics and methods; H) experimental; I) personality; J) developmental; K) counseling; L) psychotherapy; M) research apprenticeship; N) teaching of psychology; O) advanced externship (content area to be determined). Arranged by the student with a psychology faculty sponsor. Learner/sponsor contract required. Minimum time commitment: three hours per credit per week. Enrollment by permission only. Prereq: PSYC 402; 502; or permission.
      Credits: 1-4