Event: Lunchtime Sidore Lecture Series Centers on Race, Class and Gender in a Divided America

Event: Lunchtime Sidore Lecture Series Centers on Race, Class and Gender in a Divided America

Speakers include professors from Rutgers and University of Alabama
Friday, March 17, 2017

UNH Manchester invites you to join political science and public policy experts from Rutgers and the University of Alabama for the Sidore Lecture Series, a two-part discussion on race, class and gender in American politics. Entitled "Lessons from the 2016 Election: Race, Class and Gender in a Divided America," the series includes presentations on March 21 and April 13. Learn more about the sessions and speakers below.

Thanks to the generous support of The Saul O Sidore Memorial Foundation, these events are FREE and open to the public. Directions to UNH Manchester


The Politics of Voting: Who Shall be the Electors?

march 21, 12-1:15 p.m. | Room 101
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The U.S. electorate, as it was constructed in the 19th and 20th centuries, exluded people by race, class and gender. Lorraine Minnite, associate professor of public policy at Rutgers University-Camden, will share insight into the movements that rewrote the rules of democratic participation and expanded notions of a more inclusive citizenship. She will also address ongoing efforts to roll back their achievements, and shed light on the 2016 election and the implications of efforts to restrict voting rights.

Minnite has written two books on electoral rules and racial and class politics in the U.S., The Myth of Voter Fraud and Keeping Down the Black Vote: Race and the Demobilization of American Voters (coauthor). An authority on inequality, social and racial justice, political conflict and institutional change, she has served as an expert witness on several voting rights cases.

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Nevertheless, She Persisted: The Challenges and Opportunities Facing Women in Political Leadership

april 13, 12-1:15 p.m. | Room 301
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Join Nichole M. Bauer, assistant professor of political science at the University of Alabama, for a discussion about the challenges female candidates face in winning elected office, including the role of gender bias among voters, as well as their opportunities for success in the political arena.

Bauer’s research explores the psychological underpinnings motivating political attitudes and behaviors, and how the news media, campaign strategies and other political institutions influence voting behavior. Her work has been published in Political Psychology, Political Behavior, and the International Journal of Press/Politics, among other journals.

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