Kyle MacLea

ASSOCIATE PROFESSOR
Affiliate Faculty Member, Hubbard Center for Genome Studies
Phone: (603) 641-4129
Office: Life Sciences, 88 Commercial Street, RM 559, Manchester, NH 03101
Kyle MacLea

Dr. Kyle MacLea is an Associate Professor of Biological Sciences and Biotechnology at UNH Manchester where he teaches courses in the areas of molecular biology and microbiology. His research interests include prions and amyloids in yeast and human disease, microbial genetics and genomics, particularly of bacteria and bacteriophages. In the past he has also studied the biology of molting and limb regeneration in decapod crustaceans (such as crabs, lobsters, and crayfish). A member of the Council on Undergraduate Research and the Genome Consortium for Active Teaching, Dr. MacLea is keenly interested in involving undergraduate biology students in authentic scientific research experiences, inside and outside of the classroom.

Profile

Dr. Kyle MacLea is an Assistant Professor of Biology at UNH Manchester where he teaches courses in the areas of molecular biology and microbiology. His research interests include prions and amyloids in yeast and human disease, microbial genetics, and the biology of molting and limb regeneration in decapod crustaceans (such as crabs, lobsters, and crayfish). A member of the Council on Undergraduate Research and the Genome Consortium for Active Teaching, Dr. MacLea is keenly interested in involving undergraduate biology students in authentic scientific research experiences, inside and outside of the classroom.

Education

  • Ph.D., Dartmouth College
  • A.B., Cornell University

Research Interests

  • Evolution
  • Genetic Engineering
  • Genetics
  • Genomics
  • Microbiology
  • Prion Disease
  • Regenerative Medicine
  • Science Education
  • Synthetic Biology

Courses Taught

  • BIOL 413: Principles of Biology I
  • BIOT/BSCI 837/737: Microbial Genomics Lab
  • BMS 503: General Microbiology Lab 1
  • BMS 504: General Microbiology Lab
  • BMS 601: Bacteriology of Food Lab
  • BMS 602: Pathogenic Microbiology
  • BMS 603: Pathogenic Microbiology Lab
  • BSCI 418/599: Phage Bioinformatics Lab
  • BSCI 502: The Business of Biotechnology
  • BSCI 599: Topics/Bacter Adapt & Evol
  • BSCI 620: Global Science Exploration
  • BSCI 695: Exploring Biology Teaching
  • BSCI 701: Senior Seminar I
  • BSCI 737: Microbial Genomics Lab
  • BSCI 792: Research
  • BSCI 793: Internship
  • BSCI 794: Clinical Microbiol Internship
  • CHE 651: Biomanufacturing
  • UMIS 599: IS/Exploring Dentistry

Selected Publications

Williams, A. N., & MacLea, K. S. (2020). Genome Sequence of Bacillus thuringiensis Strain MW, a Freshwater Isolate. Microbiology Resource Announcements, 9(2). doi:10.1128/mra.01482-19

Williams, A. N., & MacLea, K. S. (2019). Draft Genome Sequence of Dermacoccus nishinomiyaensis TSA37, Isolated from Wood Ash. Microbiology Resource Announcements, 8(50). doi:10.1128/mra.01370-19

Maynard, C. R., & MacLea, K. S. (2019). Genome Sequence of the Radiation-Resistant Bacterium Deinococcus radiophilus ATCC 27603T. Microbiology Resource Announcements, 8(30). doi:10.1128/mra.00627-19

Simoes Junior, M., & MacLea, K. S. (2019). Genome Sequence of the Moderately Halophilic Yellow Sea Bacterium Lentibacillus salicampi ATCC BAA-719T. Microbiology Resource Announcements, 8(29). doi:10.1128/mra.00702-19

Fatima, S. A., Goen, A. E., & MacLea, K. S. (2019). Draft Genome Sequence of Xanthobacter tagetidis ATCC 700314T. Microbiology Resource Announcements, 8(28). doi:10.1128/mra.00242-19

Abuhagr, A. M., MacLea, K. S., Chang, E. S., & Mykles, D. L. (2014). Mechanistic target of rapamycin (mTOR) signaling genes in decapod crustaceans: Cloning and tissue expression of mTOR, Akt, Rheb, and p70 S6 kinase in the green crab, Carcinus maenas, and blackback land crab, Gecarcinus lateralis. Comparative Biochemistry and Physiology Part A: Molecular & Integrative Physiology, 168, 25-39. doi:10.1016/j.cbpa.2013.11.008

Kim, H. J., Kim, N. C., Wang, Y. -D., Scarborough, E. A., Moore, J., Diaz, Z., . . . Taylor, J. P. (2013). Mutations in prion-like domains in hnRNPA2B1 and hnRNPA1 cause multisystem proteinopathy and ALS. Nature, 495(7442), 467-473. doi:10.1038/nature11922

MacLea, K. S., Krieser, R. J., & Eastman, A. (2003). A family history of deoxyribonuclease II: surprises from Trichinella spiralis and Burkholderia pseudomallei. Gene, 305(1), 1-12. doi:10.1016/s0378-1119(02)01233-7

Krieser, R. J., MacLea, K. S., Longnecker, D. S., Fields, J. L., Fiering, S., & Eastman, A. (2002). Deoxyribonuclease IIα is required during the phagocytic phase of apoptosis and its loss causes perinatal lethality. Cell Death & Differentiation, 9(9), 956-962. doi:10.1038/sj.cdd.4401056

Krieser, R. J., MacLea, K. S., Park, J. P., & Eastman, A. (2001). The cloning, genomic structure, localization, and expression of human deoxyribonuclease IIβ. Gene, 269(1-2), 205-216. doi:10.1016/s0378-1119(01)00434-6

Most Cited Publications